The Rise of “El Twinkie”

With the eminent demise of Hostess, millions remain in suspense as to the fate of the infamous Twinkie, among other beloved American snacks. The global leader in packaged baked goods, Grupo Bimbo, has recently received heightened media attention as a potential buyer not because of its purchasing capacity, but because of its foreign ownership. No matter that this conglomerate accounts for over $4 billion in global sales; more want to know what will become of the Twinkie if it is manufactured south of the border by the Mexican-owned corporation.

In this era of increasing globalization and multinational commerce, foreign ownership of products sold in America should not be a surprise. But for such an iconic American staple such as the Twinkle, does this principle still hold? As history has shown, indeed it does.

Twinkie

Enjoy the occasional Bud Light or Budweiser? You can thank the Belgium-Brazilian corporation InBev for your brew. Stop at your neighborhood 7-Eleven for a pack of Trident gum? A Japanese company manages the former, while the latter is brought to you by Cadbury of the United Kingdom. Even the Ford Motor Company, which is based in Michigan, assembles vehicles with parts manufactured in Mexico, China, France, Japan and the UK.

We’ll soon find out if Hostess is to join the ranks of the aforementioned products. Wherever these seemingly-imperishable snacks may end up being made, though, they won’t move to the international food aisle at your local grocery store. After all, isn’t Sara Lee bread (owned by Grupo Bimbo) found next to Wonder Bread?

– Sofia Martinez